Friday, June 2, 2017

16 Intriguing June 2017 Book Releases

intriguing june 2017 book releases

With a new month comes a new batch of books to add to your to-read list! Several of these have really caught my eye, especially "Golden Hill," The Essex Serpent" and "A Confusion of Languages." All blurbs are adapted from Goodreads.


Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz // When editor Susan Ryeland is given the manuscript of Alan Conway’s latest novel, she has no reason to think it will be much different from any of his others. After working with the bestselling crime writer for years, she’s intimately familiar with his detective, Atticus P√ľnd, who solves mysteries disturbing sleepy English villages. But the more Susan reads, the more she’s convinced that there is another story hidden in the pages of the manuscript: one of real-life jealousy, greed, ruthless ambition, and murder.

The Alice Network by Kate Quinn // 1947: In the chaotic aftermath of World War II, American college girl Charlie St. Clair is pregnant, unmarried, and on the verge of being thrown out of her very proper family. She's also nursing a desperate hope that her beloved cousin Rose, who disappeared in Nazi-occupied France during the war, might still be alive. So when Charlie's parents banish her to Europe to have her "little problem" taken care of, Charlie breaks free and heads to London, determined to find out what happened to the cousin she loves like a sister.

The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry // Set in Victorian London and an Essex village in the 1890's, and enlivened by the debates on scientific and medical discovery which defined the era, "The Essex Serpent" has at its heart the story of two extraordinary people who fall for each other, but not in the usual way. They are Cora Seaborne and Will Ransome. Cora is a well-to-do London widow who moves to the Essex parish of Aldwinter, and Will is the local vicar. They meet as their village is engulfed by rumours that the mythical Essex Serpent, once said to roam the marshes claiming human lives, has returned. Cora, a keen amateur naturalist is enthralled, convinced the beast may be a real undiscovered species. But Will sees his parishioners' agitation as a moral panic, a deviation from true faith. Although they can agree on absolutely nothing, as the seasons turn around them in this quiet corner of England, they find themselves inexorably drawn together and torn apart.

American Eclipse by David Baron // (non-fiction) In the scorching summer of 1878, with the Gilded Age in its infancy, three tenacious and brilliant scientists raced to Wyoming and Colorado to observe a rare total solar eclipse. One sought to discover a new planet. Another -- an adventuresome female astronomer -- fought to prove that science was not anathema to femininity. And a young, megalomaniacal inventor, with the tabloid press fast on his heels, sought to test his scientific bona fides and light the world through his revelations. David Baron brings to three-dimensional life these three competitors -- James Craig Watson, Maria Mitchell, and Thomas Edison -- and thrillingly re-creates the fierce jockeying of nineteenth-century American astronomy.

The Shark Club by Ann Kidd Taylor // One summer day on the beach in Florida, two extraordinary things happen to Maeve Donnelly. First, she is kissed by Daniel, the boy of her dreams. Then, she is bitten by a blacktip shark. Eighteen years later, Maeve has thrown herself into her work as a world-traveling marine biologist discovering more about the minds of misunderstood sharks. But when Maeve returns home to the legendarily charming and eccentric Hotel of the Muses where she was raised by her grandmother, she finds more than just the blood orange sunsets and key lime pies she’s missed waiting for her. Set against the intoxicating backdrop of palm trees, calypso bands, and perfect ocean views, "The Shark Club" is a story of the mysterious passions of one woman’s life: her first love and new love; the sea and sharks that inhabit it.


The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid // An unforgettable and sweeping novel about one classic film actress’s relentless rise to the top -- the risks she took, the loves she lost, and the long-held secrets the public could never imagine. Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one in the journalism community is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now? Summoned to Evelyn’s Upper East Side apartment, Monique listens as Evelyn unfurls her story: from making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to her decision to leave show business in the late 80s, and, of course, the seven husbands along the way.

The Marsh King's Daughter by Karen Dionne // When a notorious child abductor -- known as the Marsh King -- escapes from a maximum security prison, Helena immediately suspects that she and her two young daughters are in danger. No one, not even her husband, knows the truth about Helena's past: they don't know that she was born into captivity, that she had no contact with the outside world before the age of twelve -- or that her father raised her to be a killer. And they don't know that the Marsh King can survive and hunt in the wilderness better than anyone... except, perhaps his own daughter.

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore by Matthew Sullivan // When a bookshop patron commits suicide, it’s his favorite store clerk who must unravel the puzzle he left behind in this fiendishly clever debut novel from an award-winning short story writer. Lydia Smith lives her life hiding in plain sight. A clerk at the Bright Ideas bookstore, she keeps a meticulously crafted existence among her beloved books, eccentric colleagues, and the BookFrogs -- the lost and lonely regulars who spend every day marauding the store’s overwhelmed shelves. But when Joey McGinty, a young, beguiling BookFrog, kills himself in the bookstore’s back room, Lydia’s life comes unglued. As Lydia untangles the mystery of Joey’s suicide, she unearths a long buried memory from her own violent childhood.

The Lost Letter by Jillian Cantor // A heart-breaking, heart-warming historical novel of love and survival inspired by real resistance workers during World War II Austria, and the mysterious love letter that connects generations of Jewish families. Austria, 1938. Kristoff is a young apprentice to a master Jewish stamp engraver. When his teacher disappears during Kristallnacht, Kristoff is forced to engrave stamps for the Germans, and simultaneously works alongside Elena, his beloved teacher's fiery daughter, and with the Austrian resistance to send underground messages and forge papers. As he falls for Elena amidst the brutal chaos of war, Kristoff must find a way to save her, and himself.

The Space Between the Stars by Ann Corlett // In a breathtakingly vivid and emotionally gripping debut novel, one woman must confront the emptiness in the universe -- and in her own heart -- when a devastating virus reduces most of humanity to dust and memories. All Jamie Allenby ever wanted was space. Even though she wasn’t forced to emigrate from Earth, she willingly left the overpopulated, claustrophobic planet. And when a long relationship devolved into silence and suffocating sadness, she found work on a frontier world on the edges of civilization. Then the virus hit... Now Jamie finds herself dreadfully alone, with all that’s left of the dead. Until a garbled message from Earth gives her hope that someone from her past might still be alive. Soon Jamie finds other survivors, and their ragtag group will travel through the vast reaches of space, drawn to the promise of a new beginning on Earth. But their dream will pit them against those desperately clinging to the old ways. And Jamie’s own journey home will help her close the distance between who she has become and who she is meant to be...

I Was Told To Come Alone by Souad Mekhennet // (non-fiction) For her whole life, Souad Mekhennet, a reporter for The Washington Post who was born and educated in Germany, has had to balance the two sides of her upbringing -- Muslim and Western. She has also sought to provide a mediating voice between these cultures, which too often misunderstand each other. In this compelling and evocative memoir, we accompany Mekhennet as she journeys behind the lines of jihad, starting in the German neighborhoods where the 9/11 plotters were radicalized and the Iraqi neighborhoods where Sunnis and Shia turned against one another, and culminating on the Turkish/Syrian border region where ISIS is a daily presence. Mekhennet's background has given her unique access to some of the world's most wanted men, who generally refuse to speak to Western journalists. She is not afraid to face personal danger to reach out to individuals in the inner circles of Al Qaeda, the Taliban, ISIS, and their affiliates; when she is told to come alone to an interview, she never knows what awaits at her destination. Souad Mekhennet is an ideal guide to introduce us to the human beings behind the ominous headlines, as she shares her transformative journey with us. Hers is a story you will not soon forget.


The Birdwatcher by William Shaw // Police Sergeant William South has a good reason to shy away from murder investigations: he is a murderer himself. A methodical, diligent, and exceptionally bright detective, South is an avid birdwatcher and trusted figure in his small town on the rugged Kentish coast. He also lives with the deeply buried secret that, as a child in Northern Ireland, he may have killed a man. When a fellow birdwatcher is found murdered in his remote home, South's world flips. The culprit seems to be a drifter from South's childhood; the victim was the only person connecting South to his early crime; and a troubled, vivacious new female sergeant has been relocated from London and assigned to work with South. As our hero investigates, he must work ever harder to keep his own connections to the victim, and his past, a secret.

Golden Hill by Francis Spufford // New York, a small town on the tip of Manhattan island, 1746. One rainy evening in November, a handsome young stranger fresh off the boat pitches up at a counting-house door in Golden Hill Street: this is Mr Smith, amiable, charming, yet strangely determined to keep suspicion simmering. For in his pocket, he has what seems to be an order for a thousand pounds, a huge amount, and he won't explain why, or where he comes from, or what he can be planning to do in the colonies that requires so much money. Should the New York merchants trust him? Should they risk their credit and refuse to pay? Should they befriend him, seduce him, arrest him; maybe even kill him? Rich in language and historical perception, yet compulsively readable, "Golden Hill" has a plot that twists every chapter, and a puzzle at its heart that won't let go till the last paragraph of the last page. Set a generation before the American Revolution, it paints an irresistible picture of a New York provokingly different from its later self: but subtly shadowed by the great city to come, and already entirely a place where a young man with a fast tongue can invent himself afresh, fall in love -- and find a world of trouble.

The Confusion of Languages by Siobahn Fallon // Both Cassie Hugo and Margaret Brickshaw dutifully followed their soldier husbands to the U.S. embassy in Jordan, but that's about all the women have in common. After two years, Cassie's become an expert on the rules, but newly arrived Margaret sees only her chance to explore. So when a fender-bender sends Margaret to the local police station, Cassie reluctantly agrees to watch Margaret's toddler son. But as the hours pass, Cassie's boredom and frustration turn to fear: Why isn't Margaret answering her phone, and why is it taking so long to sort out a routine accident? Snooping around Margaret's apartment, Cassie begins to question not only her friend's whereabouts but also her own role in Margaret's disappearance. Written with emotional insight and stunning prose, "The Confusion of Languages" is a shattering portrait of a collision between two women and two worlds, as well as a poignant glimpse into the private lives of American military families living overseas.

The Right Side by Spencer Quinn // In this riveting new novel by the author of the Chet and Bernie mystery series, a deeply damaged female soldier home from the war in Afghanistan becomes obsessed with finding a missing girl, gains an unlikely ally in a stray dog, and encounters new perils beyond the combat zone. Enthralling, suspenseful, and psychologically nuanced, The Right Side introduces one of the most unforgettable protagonists in modern fiction: isolated, broken, disillusioned -- yet still seeking redemption and purpose -- LeAnne takes hold of you and never lets go.

Quiet Until the Thaw by Alexandra Fuller // Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation, South Dakota. Two Native American cousins, Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson, though bound by blood and by land, find themselves at odds as they grapple with the implications of their shared heritage. When escalating anger towards the injustices, historical and current, inflicted upon the Lakota people by the federal government leads to tribal divisions and infighting, the cousins go in separate directions: Rick chooses the path of peace; You Choose, violence. Years pass, and as You Choose serves time in prison, Rick finds himself raising twin baby boys, orphaned at birth, in his meadow. As the twins mature from infants to young men, Rick immerses the boys within their ancestry, telling wonderful and terrible tales of how the whole world came to be, and affirming their place in the universe as the result of all who have come before and will come behind. But when You Choose returns to the reservation after three decades behind bars, his anger manifests, forever disrupting the lives of Rick and the boys.

9 comments:

  1. I have ARCS of The Marsh King's Daughter, The Right Side and Midnight at the Bright Ideas Book Store so there will all be appearing in my June TBR post soon. I'm also interested in seeing some reviews of The Shark Club, Magpie Murders and Seven Husbands. Hope you get to enjoy some of these!

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    1. Ooh, I'll be interested to read your reviews! Of the ones you mentioned, I think I'm most intrigued by "The Marsh King's Daughter." It sounds a little it reminiscent of last year's "The Wolf Road," which I loved!

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  2. I am PUMPED for The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo. Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore sounds interesting!! Thanks for sharing these!

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    1. I'm looking forward to it too -- after reading "Maybe in Another Life" I want to read all her books! I'm actually skimming that one again right now; it's the June book for the book club at work. Unfortunately, the two co-workers I facilitate the club with didn't like it at all! I'm a little nervous to see what everyone else thought...

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  3. I cannot wait for Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore!

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    1. I've been in a mystery mood so I was definitely intrigued by the plot! And I love the cover!

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  4. June looks to be a great month for releases - The Essex Serpent has been out for a little while here in the UK now, but I've still yet to get my hands on it + Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore looks like it could be a pretty good read. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. As soon as I saw the cover of "The Essex Serpent" I knew I had to read it! I'm on a self-imposed break from checking out new releases at the library, though, so it'll be a little while before I get to it.

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  5. I'm torn on The Space Between the Stars. It sounds like it has a lot of potential, but the cast of characters she runs into sound a bit trying-to-hard (of course there's an ex-priest and a prostitute!). The reviews on Goodreads are either brilliant or terrible, which doesn't help!

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